Stanley hand plane dating

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The irons of some reproductions have the logo stamped on both sides, but this can't be relied upon as a foolproof identification of the plane's originality since there are a lot of unused legitimate #1 irons out there and it's very easy to switch the reproduction iron with an original one.

The castings of the reproductions are coarser than on the originals, but unless you've seen an original, you really don't have any idea what the correct texture is.

This stuff is applicable to all Stanley bench planes of the basic Bailey design (as well as those that incorporate the Bailey patents such as the Bed Rocks), and comes from my observances of thousands of these planes.

All dimensions that follow each number indicate the length of the sole, the width of the cutter, and the weight of the tool.

The quickest way to tell if it is a fake is by examining the threaded rod on which the depth adjustment nut (the brass knob) traverses.

An original has its rod perfectly parallel to the sole of the plane, whereas the reproduction has its tilted upward toward the tote.

The screws used to secure the frog to the base have round heads, and not flat ones (the earliest larger bench planes had round heads, but later were changed to flat ones).

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These planes are generally in very good, or better, condition since they were used very little.They are cute little planes that look sorta neat on a mantle, or on top of your TV, which is probably a better place for them than in your shop due to their value.Every serious collector of old tools wants one of these little monkeys, which makes the cost of owning one rather steep.Bailey had experimented with several designs, but finally settled upon a style that is still being manufactured, with minor modification, today.This plane was designed to smooth small areas and was found practical by many since it can be used with one hand, much like a block plane is.I'll occasionally slip into the Stanley mantra, and use their lingo, even when I know better that it's properly called an 'iron'.

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